November 2017 Call to Action:

Join us at the Recreation and Park Commission Meeting, Thursday, November 16th at 10AM to discuss plans for the McLaren Park Trails Network. McLaren Park is designated by the City as a Natural Area and recipient of 2012 Parks Bond funding. Support the San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department in building trails in McLaren Park and in Golden Gate Park. Trail building, especially in Natural Areas, must be done in tandem with habitat restoration: planting native, wildlife-attracting plants that enrich ecosystems, conserve water and stabilize soils. 


Natural Areas Management Plan: 

Reject the appeals of the Environmental Impact Report to support the Natural Areas Management Plan with emails and public testimony to your Supervisor.

Thanks so much to everyone who attended or sent in comments for the joint Planning and Recreation and Parks Commission December 15th Hearing on the Natural Resources Management Plan.

The Planning Commission voted 6 to 1 and the Recreation and Parks Commission voted 5-0! If you want to read more, take a look at the Planning Commission Minutes and Documents and Recreation and Parks Documents from the 12/15/2016 Joint Hearing.

Congratulations, friends. Your support has helped Nature in the City bring us closer to protecting San Francisco’s special places and making “biodiversity” a household word.

We need you again, please, on one last push to protect our natural areas. We are almost across the finish line, and can get there by telling the Board of Supervisors on February 28th to REJECT THE APPEALS of the EIR of the Natural Resources Management Plan (NRMP).  

Two appeals of the EIR were filed by the deadline on January 17th. If one or both of the appeals are successful, then the planning and the management goals for all 1,100 acres of habitat across 32 parks could be delayed indefinitely.

WHAT: Board of Supervisors Hearing on the NRMP EIR Appeal

WHEN: Tuesday, February 28th at 3:00 P.M.

WHERE: City Hall Room 250, Main Board Chambers

In order to show your support for the Natural Resources Management Plan, please urge the Board of Supervisors to REJECT THE APPEALS: 

  1. Attend the February 28th hearing to speak during public comment. Let us know if you plan to attend
  2. Write emails of support to the Supervisors (especially your District Supervisor):

 Basic messages are:

  1. The Natural Resources Management Plan is critical for the conservation, restoration and stewardship of San Francisco’s local biodiversity and unique natural heritage; and,
  2. The EIR is adequate, and the appeals should be rejected

If you want to elaborate or are interested in more perspective:

Planning Process: The Planning Department performed an exceptional service to the people of San Francisco by doing an exhaustive environmental review of the Plan.

Sharp Park: We support and deem critical Recreation and Parks’ initial efforts to restore habitat for the red-legged frog and San Francisco garter snake. The project-level analysis is indeed for the natural area, not for the golf course. The project is a wetland and upland ecosystem restoration for federally listed endangered species. Nature in the City also supports much more ecological restoration and planning of the entire Sharp Park wetland complex in the future, in order for the species to be able to thrive in the face of climate change and inevitable sea-level rise.

More Talking Points for your Reference

  • This Plan guides the City to conserve and restore biodiversity, to maintain the urban forest, and to promote environmental justice
  • A total of 30 miles of trails traverse every natural area in the City Parks system – natural areas do not limit access to the parks
  • The City’s natural areas and urban nature trails provide the opportunity for ALL San Franciscans to experience healthy exercise and cultivate a connection to wild nature where they live
  • Some members of the public are concerned with the proposed tree management at one of the 32 parks, but the plan focuses on trees that are in poor or fair condition and replaces them with a younger, healthier tree that supports the urban forest and the overall environment
  • Few cities are fortunate enough to harbor natural areas and habitats within their urban environment – if we care about San Francisco's own indigenous natural ecological heritage and biodiversity, then we have to care for these incredible, beautiful natural areas
  • Natural areas provide habitat for dozens of rare and even some endangered species – without these special places, the species cannot survive
  • Various schools and colleges, academies, museums, and youth and children’s programs use the natural areas for environmental education
  • The Plan preserves 95% of the trees in the natural areas, including all of the 26 acres of native coast live oak woodlands
  • RPD is committed to an Integrated Pest Management approach, and since 2010, working closely with the Department of the Environment, has reduced its total use of currently listed Tier 1 most hazardous herbicides by 91%

Supporting the Natural Areas Management Plan with emails and public testimony.

We are asking for your help to support one of the most important advocacy actions for Nature in the City this year! We need you to tell the City to move forward with the Natural Areas Plan – a plan that will protect and conserve San Francisco’s special places today and for our children.

Here is a link to the Plan: http://sfrecpark.org/parks-open-spaces/natural-areas-program/significant-natural-resource-areas-management-plan/snramp/

As a member of Nature in the City, you know how hard we work to connect Natural Areas to communities in the Sunset District and in Bayview Hunter's Point. Please take action today to protect all 32 of these unique natural areas with a Plan that will increase the quality of life for all San Franciscans and the provide habitat for the wildlife that live among us.

What can you do?

  1. Send an email today (see sample letter below)

  2. Testify with us at a special joint meeting of the Planning Commission and Recreation and Parks Commission on Thursday, December 15th at 1PM, San Francisco City Hall, Room 400

Send an email today (see sample letter below):

Mark Buell
Commission President
Recreation and Parks Commission
Recpark.Commission@sfgov.org
 
Rodney Fong
Commission President
Planning Commission
Commissions.Secretary@sfgov.org

Dear Commission Presidents Buell and Fong:

I am writing to express my support for the Natural Resource Areas Management Plan and the certification of the Final Environmental Impact Report. Please move this document forward so that the Recreation and Parks Department can proceed with protecting and restoring our unique local environment, managing healthy urban forests, and creating opportunities for all San Franciscans to pursue a healthy lifestyle in our city parks.

I support the goals of the Natural Areas Plan to protect and restore our local ecosystems and wildlife habitats, promote sustainable and equitable access to healthy open spaces for all San Franciscans, and connect people with nature in their neighborhoods through community-based ecological stewardship.

San Francisco is lucky to harbor an unparalleled network of spectacular natural areas and habitats that exist throughout the urban environment. If we care about San Francisco's own ecological heritage and biodiversity, then we have to care for these incredibly beautiful natural areas.

Thank you for the opportunity to submit my comments for this important planning process. Please certify the Final Environmental Impact Statement and approve the Natural Areas Management Plan.

Sincerely,

 

Testify with us at a special joint meeting of the Planning Commission and Recreation and Parks Commission on Thursday, December 15th at 1PM, San Francisco City Hall, Room 400

Nature in the City's suggested talking points:

  • The approval of the Natural Areas Plan would be the most important action for San Francisco’s biodiversity since the Presidio became part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.
  • This important blueprint for special places guides the City to conserve and restore biodiversity, to maintain the urban forest, and to promote environmental justice. Showing concern for the welfare of the environment is the right thing to do.
  • We must protect and preserve the habitats and ecosystems we depend on. San Francisco’s astounding biological diversity includes over 450 species of native plants, hundreds of species of resident and migratory birds, ten federally-listed endangered species, native mammals, reptiles and amphibians.
  • The City’s natural areas and urban nature trails provide the opportunity for ALL San Franciscans to experience healthy exercise and cultivate a connection to wild nature where they live. San Francisco's natural areas permit San Franciscans to experience nature without having to go to Yosemite, the central coast, or even Point Reyes. Let's ensure the people’s safety and well-being.
  • Natural Areas are living laboratories for youth, families and scientists to engage hands-on activities to discover local nature.
  • The Plan preserves 95% of the trees in the natural areas, including all 26 acres of native coast live oak woodlands.
  • The Recreation and Parks Department manages our public lands responsibly. RPD is committed to an Integrated Pest Management approach, which means they use their hands and beneficial insects where possible instead of chemicals. Since 2010, working closely with the Department of the Environment, RPD has reduced its total use of currently listed Tier 1 most hazardous herbicides by 91%.