Preserving open spaces like Palou Phelps Park, in San Francisco's Bayview Hunter's Point for many future generations to enjoy. 

Palou Phelps Park is an urban wildflower grassland prairie located on a hill with mostly native habitat, and it is about two and a half acres in total. This open space is owned by the city of San Francisco and managed by San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department and, under its auspices, managed by the Natural Resources Division. However, seven lots in this park are privately owned by three different land owners and developers.

Working together with the newly formed Friends of Palou Phelps, we have identified the following objectives:

Palou Phelps Park will be entirely owned and managed as wild native grassland by the Recreation and Parks Department. The transfer of ownership to the City of San Francisco will:

  • Save the open space forever and eliminate the threat of development

  • Allow public access to the site in a safe and engaging way by creating proper recreational trails

  • To advocate for restoration work on the entire hill to revive the native grassland and support it with community work days and events that empower the community

  • Allow utilization of the space for potential youth educational and/or vocational training, as it is in very close proximity to Sf City College, TM Academy High School, Thurgood Marshall Middle school

Petition to Save Palou Phelps Open Space:

Our goal is to gather at least 500 San Francisco resident signatures (we have 300 so far) to present to local decision-makers in order to stop development of Palou Phelps Open Space. By signing this petition and spreading the word, you agree that this space is too important to be lost forever to development.

Sign the petition: 





Zip Code: 
Comments: 

Please do not send email: 

We, the San Francisco residents who enjoy Palou Phelps Open Space request: 

  1. San Francisco Planning Department reject the proposed development of two single-family homes at 1913-1915 Quesada Avenue. If these homes are built, Palou Phelps Open Space will be severely compromised, and access will be reduced for local residents

  2. San Francisco Department of Public Works reject the proposed development of the 'paper street' extended from Quesada Avenue into Palou Phelps Open Space to build road access for the above proposed development, which will encroach onto existing public land and destroy one of the few remaining San Francisco wild prairie ecosystems

  3. San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department purchase the remaining eight private lots that make up Palou Phelps Open Space to preserve it as public park land to provide enjoyment and education for local families and community scientists

Please contact Zahra Kelly, Director of Public Advocacy at Nature in the City, for more information and how to help: zahra@natureinthecity.org